Ronald Rolheiser, a Roman Catholic priest and member of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, is president of the Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, Texas.

He is a community-builder, lecturer and writer. His books are popular throughout the English-speaking world and his weekly column is carried by more than seventy newspapers worldwide.


Fr. Rolheiser can be reached at his website, www.ronrolheiser.com

Recently a man came to me, asking for help. He carried some deep wounds, not physical wounds, but emotional wounds to his soul.

Who are we to judge what is a sin?

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Recently, while on the road giving a workshop, I took the opportunity to go the cathedral in that city for a Sunday Eucharist. I was taken aback by the homily.

Churches must be a sanctuary for all

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Whenever we have been at our best, as Christians, we have opened our churches as sanctuaries to the poor and the endangered.

Connecting the dots between the crib and the cross

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The Gospel stories about the birth of Jesus are not a simple retelling of the events that took place then, at the stable in Bethlehem.

End of the world is least of our worries

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People are forever predicting the end of the world.

The danger in being a warrior prophet

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A prophet makes a vow of love, not of alienation. Daniel Berrigan wrote those words and they need to be highlighted today when a lot of very sincere, committed, religious people self-define as cultural warriors, as prophets at war with secular culture.

There is light within dark nights of the soul

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Atheism is a parasite that feeds on bad religion. That’s why, in the end, atheistic critics are our friends. They hold our feet to the fire.

Finding the real presence of Jesus

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When I was a graduate student in Belgium, I was privileged one day to sit in on a conference given by Cardinal Godfried Danneels of Brussels.

There’s no easy path to true intimacy

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There’s nothing simple about being a human being.

Boredom is a fault within ourselves

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In 2011, a book by a young writer, Bieke Vandekerckhove, won the award as Spiritual Book of the Year in her native Belgium.

Restlessness is not worth cultivating

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Thirty-four years ago when I launched this column, I would never have said this: restlessness is not something to be cultivated, no matter how romantic that might seem.