Ronald Rolheiser, a Roman Catholic priest and member of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, is president of the Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, Texas.

He is a community-builder, lecturer and writer. His books are popular throughout the English-speaking world and his weekly column is carried by more than seventy newspapers worldwide.


Fr. Rolheiser can be reached at his website, www.ronrolheiser.com

What is meant when certain schools of psychology warn us about our “shadow”? What’s our shadow?

God’s love has the power to give new life

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Fifth Sunday of Lent, April 2 (Year A) Ezekiel 37:12-14; Psalm 130; Romans 8:8-11; John 11:1-45

How can someone be dead and living at the same time?

Nothing is ever really ours to keep

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Everything is gift. That’s a principle that ultimately undergirds all spirituality, all morality and every commandment.

God’s sacred energy powers our lives

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All things considered, I believe that I grew up with a relatively healthy concept of God.

There’s honest sin and dishonest sin

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There’s an axiom which says: Nothing feels better than virtue.

We all lose when it’s only about winning

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Our society tends to divide us into winners and losers. Sadly, we don’t often reflect on how this affects our relationships with each other, nor on what it means for us as Christians.

It is our duty to welcome the stranger

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In the Hebrew Scriptures, that part of the Bible we call the Old Testament, we find a strong religious challenge to always welcome the stranger, the foreigner.

Forgiveness can conquer bitterness

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One of the dangers inherent in trying to live out a life of Christian fidelity is that we are prone to become embittered moralizers, older brothers of the prodigal son, angry and jealous at God’s over-generous mercy, bitter because persons who wander and stray can so easily access the heavenly banquet table.

God’s power is found in His powerlessness

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The French novelist and essayist Léon Bloy once made this comment about God’s power in our world: “God seems to have condemned himself until the end of time not to exercise any immediate right of a master over a servant or a king over a subject. We can do what we want. He will defend Himself only by His patience and His beauty.”

Sabbath rest needed now more than ever

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Early Christian monks believed in something they called acedia. More colloquially, they called it the “noonday devil,” a name that essentially describes the concept.

Taking our wounds to the Eucharist

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Recently a man came to me, asking for help. He carried some deep wounds, not physical wounds, but emotional wounds to his soul.