Features/Features

When most people think of the song "White Christmas" they think of Bing Crosby or the 1942 musical Holiday Inn. I think of a cold night in 1976 when I was walking in the snow with my good friend Frank. As we walked we tried to remember the lyrics of various Christmas songs. The one song where we both knew more than a few words was "White Christmas." I remember filling the streets with our not so melodious sounds and lots of laughter.

Somerville Lecture - Bridging the Gap: Overcoming our Differences

By

Winnipeg Archbishop James WeisgerberEditor's note: The following is the text of the sixth annual Henry Somerville Lecture in Christianity and Communications. Titled "Bridging the Gap: Overcoming our Differences," it was presented by Archbishop James Weisgerber of Winnipeg on Nov. 30 at the Newman Centre in Toronto and on Dec. 1 at St. Jerome's University in Waterloo.

I am happy to take this opportunity tonight to address you not as a professional theologian, but as the pastor of a diocesan church. I would like to share with you the vision that guides me in my responsibilities as pastor of a particular church and as a member of the College of Bishops, which, together with the Pope, guides the universal church.

Interfaith marriage a threat to the faith?

By

Is marriage becoming a threat to religion? As more Canadians marry outside of their faith, religious leaders are starting to worry about how the children of interfaith marriages will ever gain a religious identity.

The Holy Family is a true witness to marriage

By

Holy FamilyMISSISSAUGA, Ont. - When Canada was caught up in the midst of its gut-wrenching debate over legalizing same-sex marriage last year, Fr. Norm Roberts wondered whether there was a positive way to get out the church's message about the value of marriage and the family.

Contraception helped foster unsettled society

By

Janet SmithTORONTO - "Contraception why not?" is the question that Dr. Janet Smith has been posing to audiences for 20 years, a talk that has led to the sale of more than one million taped copies of her talk sold worldwide.

Canadian surplus should help families

By

TORONTO - Failure to reduce Canada's 17-per-cent child poverty rate over the past five years is creating a deficit that can't be erased by paying down government debt, say the authors of Campaign 2000's 2006 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty.

Franciscan way goes mainstream

By

The Christmas CrecheTORONTO - Following St. Francis into Advent starts with a concrete, physical, tangible, searingly real sense of the incarnation, according to Toronto-area Franciscans who will spend the four weeks leading up to Christmas doing things most Catholics do — preparing a Christmas crèche, attending Advent liturgies, singing carols and getting ready for the Feast of the Nativity.

Catholic tradition supports access to universal health care

By
Dr. Bridget CampionTORONTO - The seemingly endless debate about private versus public health care in Canada naturally lends itself to a Catholic take, bioethicist Bridget Campion told a small audience at the end of an evening in which the Canadian Catholic Bioethics Institute split the podium between pro-medicare family doctor Claudette Chase and pro-private sector economist John Kyle.

Rethinking the Crusades

By

OTTAWA - The Crusades are widely seen as a barbaric series of wars led by a ruthless Catholic Church against peaceful inhabitants of the Holy Land, says Anthony Schratz, an amateur historian who has spent 20 years investigating controversies in church history.

Looking to Scriptures for answers to the Korean nuclear crisis

By

The Israelites of biblical times could never have predicted that a couple thousand years down the road nations would face off against each other with weapons that could kill hundreds of thousands all at once. But they did know about arms races, and they knew about the relationship of small nations with great empires.

A time to remember

By

 When Canada was a nation of just 11.3 million it saw 45,300 of its young men die in the Second World War, just one generation removed from the 66,665 men who died in the Great War.